NOTICE: USPS raised Media Mail Rates effective July 10, 2022. See our Shipping Policy for details.

Pearl Jam Vinyl Records

Pearl Jam Vinyl Records

45 products
  • Pearl Jam - Ten Vinyl LP (88985376871)

     

    Pearl Jam Ten Vinyl LP
    Regular price
    Sold out
    Sale price
    $21.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Vs Vinyl LP (88697843131)

     

    Pearl Jam - Vs Vinyl LP Reissue (88697843131)
    Regular price
    $26.99
    Sale price
    $26.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Vitalogy Vinyl LP (88697843111JK1)

     

    Pearl Jam - Vitalogy Vinyl LP (88697843111-JK1)
    Regular price
    $42.99
    Sale price
    $42.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - No Code Vinyl LP (8875188981)

     

    Pearl Jam - No Code Vinyl LP Reissue (8875188981)
    Regular price
    $39.99
    Sale price
    $39.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Yield Vinyl LP (88985303661)

     

    Pearl Jam - Yield Vinyl LP Reissue (88985303661)
    Regular price
    $25.99
    Sale price
    $25.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Binaural Vinyl LP (88985409121A)

     

    Pearl Jam - Binaural Vinyl LP Reissue (88985409121A)
    Regular price
    $32.99
    Sale price
    $32.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Riot Act Vinyl LP (88985409131)

     

    Pearl Jam - Riot Act Vinyl LP Reissue (88985409131)
    Regular price
    $35.99
    Sale price
    $35.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Pearl Jam (Avocado) Vinyl LP (88985409141)

     

    Pearl Jam - Pearl Jam (Avocado) Vinyl LP Reissue (88985409141)
    Regular price
    $39.99
    Sale price
    $39.99

     

  • Pearl Jam ‎- Alive Vinyl LP (19439853991)

     

    Pearl Jam ‎- Alive Vinyl LP (19439853991)
    Regular price
    $16.99
    Sale price
    $16.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Backspacer Vinyl LP (MWR9413)

     

    Pearl Jam - Backspacer Vinyl LP Reissue (MWR-9413)
    Regular price
    Sold out
    Sale price
    $24.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Lightning Bolt Vinyl LP (B001898301)

     

    Pearl Jam Lightning Bolt Vinyl LP for Sale
    Regular price
    Sold out
    Sale price
    $38.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Let's Play Two Vinyl LP (B002696501)

     

    Pearl Jam - Let's Play Two Vinyl LP Reissue (B0026965-01)
    Regular price
    Sold out
    Sale price
    $35.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Gigaton Vinyl LP (60250863023)

     

    Pearl Jam Gigaton Vinyl LP
    Regular price
    $39.99
    Sale price
    $39.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Ten Redux Vinyl LP (88697413021)

     

    Pearl Jam Ten Remastered Vinyl LP
    Regular price
    $35.99
    Sale price
    $35.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Live in Chicago 1992 Vinyl LP (CL74368)

     

    Pearl Jam - Live in Chicago 1992 Vinyl LP (CL74368)
    Regular price
    $21.99
    Sale price
    $21.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Completely Unplugged - The Acoustic Broadcast Vinyl (PARA323LP)

     

    Pearl Jam - Completely Unplugged - The Acoustic Broadcast Vinyl (PARA323LP)
    Regular price
    $32.99
    Sale price
    $32.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Live at Easy Street Vinyl LP (753677604971)

     

    Pearl Jam - Live at Easy Street Vinyl LP (753677604971)
    Regular price
    $24.99
    Sale price
    $24.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Live at Civic Center in Pensacola FL 1994 Vinyl LP (DOR2132H)

     

    Pearl Jam - Live at Civic Center in Pensacola FL 1994 Vinyl LP (DOR2132H)
    Regular price
    Sold out
    Sale price
    $26.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - The Broadcast Collection Vinyl LP Box Set (PARA044BX)

     

    Pearl Jam - The Broadcast Collection Vinyl LP Box Set (PARA044BX)
    Regular price
    $104.99
    Sale price
    $104.99

     

  • Singles Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Vinyl LP (889853155118)

     

    Singles Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Vinyl LP (889853155118)
    Regular price
    Sold out
    Sale price
    $29.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Live at the Fox Theater Atlanta 1994 Vinyl LP (DOR2094H)

     

    Pearl Jam - Live at the Fox Theater Atlanta 1994 Vinyl LP (DOR2094H)
    Regular price
    $21.99
    Sale price
    $21.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Building Bridges: The Acoustic Broadcasts Vinyl LP (PARA192LP)

     

    Pearl Jam - Building Bridges: The Acoustic Broadcasts Vinyl LP
    Regular price
    $32.99
    Sale price
    $32.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Acoustic in Mountainview, CA Vinyl LP (MIND721)

     

    Pearl Jam - Acoustic in Mountainview, CA Vinyl LP
    Regular price
    $54.99
    Sale price
    $54.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Bushleaguer Single 7" Vinyl (889854388171)

     

    Pearl Jam - Bu$hleaguer Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - World Wide Suicide Single 7" Vinyl (889854388478)

     

    Pearl Jam - World Wide Suicide Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Given To Fly Single 7" Vinyl (889853036479)

     

    Pearl Jam - Given To Fly Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Hail, Hail Single 7" Vinyl (888751890176)

     

    Pearl Jam - Hail, Hail Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - I Am Mine Single 7" Vinyl (889854388270)

     

    Pearl Jam - I Am Mine Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Light Years Single 7" Vinyl (889854387976)

     

    Pearl Jam - Light Years Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Nothing As It Seems Single 7" Vinyl (889854387877)

     

    Pearl Jam - Nothing As It Seems Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Off He Goes Single 7" Vinyl (888751889972)

     

    Pearl Jam - Off He Goes Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

  • Pearl Jam - Save You Single 7" Vinyl (889854388379)

     

    Pearl Jam - Save You Single 7
    Regular price
    $10.99
    Sale price
    $10.99

     

Buy New & Used Pearl Jam Vinyl LPs

If you need help with your 90’s alternative vinyl record collection, commit this list to memory…Jams that are good: any slow jam by Mary J. Blige. Jams that are bad: ESPN’s Jock Jams. Jams that are great: Pearl Jam. That is all – list complete.

Pearl Jam, formed in 1990, helped ignite the Seattle grunge explosion and quickly became one of the most influential bands of the decade. Combining raw, sinister vocals with heavy guitars and intense emotion, made Pearl Jam a continuous staple on alternative rock radio channels everywhere.

Releasing music on vinyl first, Pearl Jam’s legendary Ten album is still one of the biggest-selling rock records ever produced, while their follow up album Vs., set a record for most copies sold during its first five days of release. So, if you’re considering passing on these Pearl Jam albums, you should check your pulse “Jeremy”, because odds are, you’re not “Alive”. Free tip: be a “Better Man” and “Spin the Black Circle” with the vinyl records here. Ticketmaster fees do not apply.

More than Just Pearl Jam Records for Sale

Love Pearl Jam but looking to add other artists into your vinyl collection? Binaural Records carries an assortment of alternative and grunge rock albums from popular artists like Nirvana, Alice in ChainsChris Cornell, SoundgardenTemple of the Dog, Foo Fighters, and more.

Pearl Jam Artist Biography

Countless bands try to claim the label of the "voice of a generation," but one that can actually do it and no one will bat an eye is Pearl Jam. Sure, we might be biased — you may, uh, notice by the name of this website and record store — but the group's influence is undeniable. Since forming in Seattle in 1990, Eddie Vedder and company not only helped create the genre of grunge while becoming one of the most important bands over the last 30 years — but have shifted the way we'll think about rock music forever.

The Formation

In the 80s, Stone Gossard and Jeff Ament were members of a band with Mark Arm and Steve Turner of Mudhoney fame called Green River that had decent success but disbanded in 1987. Next, they formed Mother Love Bone with vocalist Andrew Wood of the band Malfunkshun and spent a couple of years touring around the burgeoning late-80s Seattle music scene. During this time, Mother Love Bone signed to PolyGram and recorded a record called Apple. But sadly, four months before the debut was released, Wood died from a heroin overdose. A tragedy of massive levels, cutting the band's career much, much too short. Ament and Gossard were devastated.

While reeling from the pain, Gossard began writing more intense music inspired by the loss. With the help of fellow Seattle musician Mike McCready, Gossard reconnected with Ament and the trio started recording some of the music Gossard had been writing. During this time, they met former Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Jack Irons and gave him a demo, asking him if he'd be interested in joining the band and if he knew of any potential vocalists. Although Irons passed, he did share the tape with a friend of his who lived in San Diego.

That friend was none other than Eddie Vedder.

Legend has it that Vedder — who at the time was playing in a band called Bad Radio while working at a gas station — listened to the tape shortly before going surfing. While out in the water, lyrics struck him, and he immediately recorded vocals to three songs from the tape: "Alive," "Once," and "Footsteps." He sent the recordings, later dubbed the Mamasan Trilogy, back up to Seattle, and the band was impressed enough to fly him up immediately.

The year was 1990, and within a week, Eddie Vedder had officially joined the band, unknowingly the beginnings of what would be Pearl Jam. Funny how the greatest things have actual beginnings, eh?

Early Years, Mookie Blaylock, and Becoming Pearl Jam

The band added drummer Dave Krusen and started working under the moniker Mookie Blaylock, a name they took based on the young basketball player who was, at the time, playing for the New Jersey Nets. (In a later interview, Gossard would explain how much they loved Mookie then.) The band played its first official show at the Off Ramp Cafe in Seattle on October 22, 1990, before joining Alice In Chains as an opener. Within a couple of months, the band signed to Epic Records, changing their name to Pearl Jam.

Pearl Jam changed their name from Mookie Blaylock because of legal concerns. Obviously, they loved the guy though, and they'd show it again by naming their debut record Ten, an obvious nod to Mookie Blaylock's jersey number.

But where did the name Pearl Jam come from? There are multiple origin stories for the name Pearl Jam. Initially, Eddie Vedder said that it was a reference to his great-grandmother named Pearl who was married to a Native American person and together they cooked up some jam with peyote as an ingredient. If your instincts tell you that story sounds like bullshit some 20-somethings would make up in the early 90s as a name origin story, your instincts are correct. Vedder would later tell Rolling Stone that the great-grandmother-peyote story was bullshit.

And what about that… other theory? You know, the whole, uh, semen thing? Well, the band denies that too. Make of that what you will.

Anyway, the most likely scenario is that the band simply liked the word "Pearl." It's beautiful and Vedder did have a great-grandmother named Pearl, and it's surfing slang for submerging the nose of your board. Vedder also claims that he likes thinking about the meaning of the word and that the result of the creative conflict is similar to the process of turning a grain of sand in an oyster into a jewel. Oh, and they added "Jam" on the end after seeing Neil Young in concert and being amazed by his jamming skills going for almost 20 minutes on songs. An appropriate namesake, if you ask us.

The Release of Ten (1991) and Early Seattle Grunge Impact

Pearl Jam entered Seattle's London Bridge Studios in March 1991 to record their debut album Ten, which would end up being quite possibly the most quintessential grunge album of all time. Much of the music on the album was written by Gossard and Ament, some even for Mother Love Bone, and Vedder helped reshape them with new lyrics and melodies. Sessions lasted for a little over a month, and after they finished, drummer Dave Krusen left the band due to his struggles with alcoholism and was temporarily replaced with Matt Chamberlain before bringing aboard Dave Abbruzzese full time.

Ten released to the reception of immediate success, both commercial and critical. It's easy to see in the grand scheme why it hit the way it did. The early ‘90s were an interesting and challenging time in America. Coming out of the conservative 80s, the 90s represented the feeling of freedom. Grunge emerged through this attitude, becoming an outlet for an angsty generation searching for meaning. The band toured throughout 1992 to much fanfare while appearing on Saturday Night Live and MTV Unplugged before nabbing a slot at Lollapalooza.

The themes of Ten included frustration, anger, suicide, and self-loathing and were spat through such aggressive and intense music that hit audiences perfectly. Alongside fellow Seattle bands like Soundgarden and Nirvana, Pearl Jam achieved what many great musicians aspire towards: helping people understand and express what's inside of them, maybe better than they ever could. This musical relationship with fans would prove to be the foundation upon which the band continued to build success.

Vs. (1993) and Vitalogy (1994), and Cementing Fame

Immediately, the band took issue with their success, which makes sense considering the music is built upon an attempt to achieve real, human connections. Vedder and the rest of the band, at their core, represent the antithesis of traditional rock stars. These guys didn't dress themselves up in leather that shimmered in front of stage lights. They proudly wore old flannel shirts you could find at a thrift store — the more holes in the shirt the better.

But their impact grew, but rather than running from the crowds, the band used it as fuel to create. They recorded their sophomore record Vs. and released it on October 19, 1993, selling almost a million records in the first week. Hits on Vs. included "Go," "Daughter, and "Animal," and Vedder's songwriting was being compared to other young male poets of music history such as Jim Morrison or Pete Townshend. And similar to these greats, Vedder avoided the press — taking an attitude that was of a true artist, making music for the fans and nothing more, embracing the everyman nature of his and the rest of the band's mystique.

Moreover, the band openly warred with Corporate America. In 1994, it was learned that Ticketmaster was price-gouging Pearl Jam tickets through reporting by Chuck Phillips, so the band absolved themselves from a relationship with Ticketmaster. To some success (and some failure due to Ticketmaster's grip on the industry), the band attempted to work directly with venues for shows. Eventually, in 1994, Gossard and Ament testified before congress in a case against Ticketmaster, which resulted in legislation being written that tried to prevent Ticketmaster price-gouging. (The band would continue touring throughout 1995 without help from Ticketmaster.)

During this time, the band was also recording Vitalogy, which would eventually release on November 22, 1994, to more success, birthing singles "Better Man," "Not for You," and "Spin the Black Circle" (which would win a Grammy.) These recording sessions proved challenging as they would also cause drummer Dave Abbruzzese (who'd joined during the Ten tour) to leave the band and be replaced by Jack Irons, the former Red Hot Chili Pepper who'd, as you probably remember, introduced Vedder to Gossard and Ament back in 1990.

There's something particularly American about Pearl Jam, and this period is a strong example of that. The band viewed their work with a blend of artistry and everyday work, a punk recipe that pushed against the narratives of major labels. The commitment to individuality as an ethos is a core pillar of the band's success and one that's reflected in the music from this era.

The Late ‘90s, No Code (1996) and Yield (1998)

As the 90s continued, Pearl Jam continued to grow in popularity while maintaining a counterculture spirit, with band members dealing with the intensity of fame and how that can displace the spirit of a creator.

With this mentality, Pearl Jam recorded No Code — the most experimental record since Ten, featuring a wider range of instrumentation and a dosing of ballads — and released it on August 27, 1996. The band's alternative direction in sound confused critics, though, and No Code wasn't met with the best response, both critically and commercially. In fact, radio stations ditched the record almost immediately — and when analyzing the band's placement in musical history, No Code is often marked as the "official" end of grunge.

The band remained in the spotlight, attempting to stay steadfast against the major label world (while being signed to a major label), and continuing war against Ticketmaster was taking its toll. Gossard would later tell Spin Magazine that there was "a lot of stress associated with trying to tour at that time" and that "it was growing more and more difficult to be excited about being part of the band."

But in true Pearl Jam fashion, the group pressed onward — and changed drummers again, this time hiring Soundgarden's Matt Cameron to replace Jack Irons who'd left the band because he was frustrated with the band's heavy tour schedule. Yield, which Irons recorded and briefly toured with the band before his departure, was released on February 3, 1998, featuring singles "Given to Fly" and "Wishlist," and was viewed as a return to form not found since the band's beginnings. And it was at this point that the band resolved some issues with Ticketmaster, able to truly tour for the first time in years, leading to massive success and the release of Live on Two Legs, a live album compiled from tour stops.

In 1998, the band also recorded a cover of "Last Kiss," which accidentally became a massive hit. The next year, simply out of demand from the public, the band released it as a single. A hugely successful song — you can probably hear the rendition in your head as you read this — and the group saw its success as an opportunity and donated all "Last Kiss" proceeds to aid refugees of the Kosovo War, helping in the best way they could.

Binaural (2000), Tragedy, Riot Act (2002), and Leaving Epic Records

The turn of the millennium meant that Pearl Jam would exit the ‘90s as the most popular rock band of the decade. A bit of a strange title to have, but the band responded by recording more music. Moreover, the band elevated its relationship with tape culture. The group had always encouraged fans to record and distribute their music throughout communities, but around this time, they began participating and releasing official bootlegs of all shows. The band's output had always fostered a ferocious fan mentality, but this decision helped elevate it to a different level. Fans dissected and achieved all live performances in a way that was similar to other rabid fanbases, such as Deadheads.

On May 16, 2000, they released Binaural — and you know we like that one. The record was drummer Matt Cameron's studio debut and wrestled with various themes of struggle with addiction while Vedder fought through writer's block. The record was named after the binaural recording techniques that were utilized by producer Tchad Blake, offering a more holistic sound that captures the complexities of Pearl Jam's instrumentation.

2000 also brought unfortunate and unwanted tragedy. Near the end of the band's European tour, nine fans died after being crushed near the stage while performing at the Roskilde Festival in Denmark. Once there was a realization of what was happening, the band wasn't able to stop it.

It's difficult to illustrate the impact this tragedy had on the band. Just a horrible thing to think about, trying to imagine what that kind of experience would be like while on stage.

Later, Vedder would speak about the challenging nature of it, and how continuing to tour helped them focus and heal, taking a year off before starting work on Riot Act, with music directly created to help parse the Roskilde Festival tragedy. Multiple songs such as "I Am Mine," "LBC," "Thumbing My Way," and "Arc" were born from the fallout of the tragedy. Riot Act was released on November 12, 2002, and met with esteemed praise. Continuing their punk and grunge ethos, the band protested heavily throughout the Riot Act tour, with Vedder often performing in a George W. Bush mask while playing the track "Bu$hleaguer" off the album. With Riot Act, the band closed out their deal with Epic Records and left the label.

Around this time, the band also released Lost Dogs, a two-disc compilation album, on November 11, 2003. It was a collection of B-sides and other unreleased material, and showcased just how productive the band had been over the years — but perhaps more significantly, illustrated how selective they'd been as artists, revealing their talent as editors as much as writers. Lost Dogs debuted at number 15 on the Billboard 200, eventually going Gold.

Joining J Records, Self-Titled, Monkeywrench, and Entering the Pearl Jam's Second Act In 2006, Pearl Jam signed to J Records, executive Clive Davis's venture with Sony. There, the band had more creative freedom while still harnessing the power of the music industry and being a successful band. Over 15 years into their career, the band began moving gracefully from an incisive and bold young band — creating music that harnessed and channeled the specific frustration and anger of Generation X — into something more mature. Still mad as hell, still defining music, but with a larger lens on what the world means and how to impact it.

With Pearl Jam, aka Avocado, the band's eighth record, they embraced the idea of a self-titled record, finding their roots once again, and creating an album that was compared to Vs. and carried heavier tones with tracks like "Worldwide Suicide." The band was very vocal about their politics, criticizing U.S. foreign policy and taking stands against George W. Bush, performing at various Vote for Change rallies throughout the decade.

It's through this that the band showed, despite selling millions of records, Eddie Vedder and company still proved they stood for something — understanding their role and influence in culture. Pearl Jam toured the world and headlined multiple festivals, assuring themselves as one of — if not the — great modern American rock band.

Later, in 2009, the band recorded and released their ninth studio album Backspacer, released on September 20, 2009. A record contained more lyrical optimism than a typical Pearl Jam record — something Vedder credited to the election of Barack Obama — and debuted at number one on the Billboard charts, the first Pearl Jam record to do so since No Code, and achieved a generally positive reception, being praised for its assured lyrics and innovative musicality. Moreover, the band released it through their own label imprint Monkeywrench Records, their first time doing so.

They capped the 00s with a cover of The Who's "Love, Reign o'er Me" in 2008 for the film Reign Over Me, a quietly powerful film that dissected the impact of 9/11. Pearl Jam understood how to send a message, both subtly and overtly.

Lightning Bolt (2013), Gigaton (2020), and the Cementing of a Legacy

The band continued to work. Over two decades into their career, they released their 10th studio album Lightning Bolt on October 14, 2013, before setting off on a two-leg North American tour. The record sold 166,000 copies in its first week and went number one on the Billboard 200. In other words, they still had it and continued to tour relentlessly for the better part of the 2010s. Then in 2020, they released Gigaton, a late-career record focused on bringing awareness to climate change that achieved positive reception from critics.

The legacy of Pearl Jam is one of hardworking success rooted in bold statements about humanity and the world. Yes, they hit it big almost immediately — and rocketed in a way that was almost too fast and too assured. But this was countered and leveled out by the consistency of the product. A generation embraced their impact, but they worked against the potential for capitalistic gain, understanding their impact while not succumbing to it (their fight against Ticketmaster in the ‘90s being a strong example).

What does it mean to be American? Pearl Jam attempts to answer that question. Hard work, humility, and an attempt to understand the other. There's beauty in the music, complicated guitar soundscapes that whip around you like a tornado, but then Vedder counters the aggressiveness with elegant and succinct lyrics, understanding the Big Questions without getting lost in cliche.

A truly great band — and yeah, we know we're biased.

Pearl Jam Vinyl & Band FAQs

What does Pearl Jam mean?

There are many different stories of this meaning, but frontman Eddie Vedder defines Pearl Jam as the creative conflict that turns the grain of sand in an oyster into a jewel. You know, like a pearl.

How did Pearl Jam get their name?

This is a good story. The band Pearl Jam originally named itself after which NBA basketball player? Well, the answer to that is Mookie Blaylock. Yes, Pearl Jam was originally named Mookie Blaylock. (This is also why the first Pearl Jam album is named Ten, which is honoring Mookie Blaylock's jersey number.) However, Blaylock signed his deal with Epic Records, so the band was forced to take a new name, eventually settling on Pearl Jam after a brainstorm session.


There are many different stories of how the band came to the name Pearl Jam, and it's primarily a myth of their own creating. Vedder said in an early promotional video that Pearl Jam was a reference to his great-grandmother Pearl who was married to a Native American and had a special recipe for peyote-laced jam. He grew up, though, and eventually told Rolling Stone in 2006 that story was horseshit, even though he did have a great-grandma named Pearl.

The band has since explained that they came up with the name of Pearl Jam in two steps. It started when bassist Jeff Ament suggested the name "Pearl" inspired by the struggle of the creative process, and then the band added "Jam" after attending a Neil Young concert and watching him improving and extending songs. Uncle Neil strikes again.

When was Pearl Jam formed?

Pearl Jam was formed in Seattle in 1990. The origin story is that guitarist Stone Gossard and bassist Jeff Ament dissolved their band Green River — a moderately successful grunge band signed to Sub Pop Records — in the mid-1980s due to creative differences with other bandmates. They went on to start another band called Mother Love Bone with Malfunkshun vocalist Andrew Wood. However, only four short months after Mother Love Bone released their debut album, Wood died of a heroin overdose.

Ament and Gossard were shaken by the news, and ended Mother Love Bone. They eventually teamed up with local Seattle guitarist Mike McCready and the trio started recording music as a form of therapy. They realized they had something, and with hopes of finding a vocalist and drummer, they sent out demo tapes to whomever would listen, including former Red Hot Chili Peppers drums Jack Irons. He passed on the offer, but gave the demo to his buddy Eddie Vedder, a California vocalist and surfer who was working part time at a gas station while singing in a band called Bad Radio. He listened to the tape shortly before going surfing, and while riding waves, the lyrics came to him. He recorded vocals of three songs for the demo, "Alive," "Once," and "Footsteps." Vedder sent the vocals back to the band in Seattle. Within weeks, he'd auditioned and officially joined. The band's first official gig was at the Off Ramp Café in Seattle on October 22, 1990.

What was the first album by Pearl Jam?

Pearl Jam's first album is called Ten, named after former professional basketball player Mookie Blaylock's jersey number. Ten featured songs like "Alive," "Even Flow," and "Jeremy," and would go on to sell millions and millions of copies while receiving multiple Grammy nominations.

How many records has Pearl Jam sold?

How high can you count? Pearl Jam is one of the most successful rock bands of the last 25 years. Throughout that time, they have sold an estimated 60,000,000 plus albums. In case you can't count zeros, Pearl Jam has sold 60 million plus records throughout their career. Not too bad, eh?

Who are the members of Pearl Jam? Who is their lead singer?

Current Members of Pearl Jam:

  • Jeff Ament – bass, backing vocals (1990–present)
  • Stone Gossard – rhythm and lead guitar, backing vocals (1990–present)
  • Mike McCready – lead guitar, backing vocals (1990–present)
  • Eddie Vedder – lead vocals, rhythm guitar (1990–present)
  • Matt Cameron – drums, percussion, backing vocals (1998–present)

Former Members of Pearl Jam:

  • Dave Krusen – drums, percussion (1990–1991; touring guest 2017)
  • Matt Chamberlain – drums, percussion (1991)
  • Dave Abbruzzese – drums, percussion (1991–1994)
  • Jack Irons – drums, percussion, backing vocals (1994–1998)
x